Questions you've always wanted answered

Discuss anything interesting but not remotely Countdown-related here.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Charlie Reams » Tue May 31, 2011 3:17 pm

Phil Reynolds wrote:On a related point, if I have room lights operated by dimmer switches and I turn down the dimmers so the light level in the room is reduced, am I using less electricity or does the consumption in fact remain exactly the same with a higher proportion of the power being dissipated as heat?
The dimmer switch is usually a variable resistor, so it will reduce the power, yep.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by David Williams » Tue May 31, 2011 3:41 pm

Charlie Reams wrote:
Phil Reynolds wrote:On a related point, if I have room lights operated by dimmer switches and I turn down the dimmers so the light level in the room is reduced, am I using less electricity or does the consumption in fact remain exactly the same with a higher proportion of the power being dissipated as heat?
The dimmer switch is usually a variable resistor, so it will reduce the power, yep.
Forgive the attempt to remember O Level Physics, but if you introduce, say, a resistance equal to that of the light in series with it, that halves the current, so the power consumption is halved. But half of that power generates heat in the dimmer switch, so only a quarter of the original power is getting to the light bulb. So is the answer to Phil's question "Less electricity used, but a higher proportion dissipated"?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by JimBentley » Tue May 31, 2011 4:32 pm

Jon O'Neill wrote:How much money does leaving a phone charger plugged in and switched on with no phone attached cost?
How about with a phone attached?
How about a TV on standby?
How about a light bulb?
How about a strip light like in my kitchen?
How about a TV switched on?
How about a vacuum cleaner?

Order the above by how much it costs to run each for an hour.

Thanks.
Dunno if this might help, it looks quite comprehensive. Not that I can vouch for its accuracy, mind, it might all be a load of shit.

Oh wait, that's just for standby power.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon Corby » Mon Oct 03, 2011 2:28 pm

Why do goalkeepers go up for corners, often leaving 1 or 2 defenders back instead? (see Spurs v Arsenal yesterday for an example.) I can understand them going in for it if everybody is, but why on earth should he go forward in place of a defender otherwise? It's a reasonable assumption that the defender will be better equipped to take on any chance which may have fallen to the keeper, and also that the keeper would be better equipped to deal with any counter-attack by being in his own box and being able to handle it, than a defender stood somewhere around the halfway-line (and is that even a concern, surely the keeper going up for the corner says "we don't really care if we concede again, we need to score with this attack"). Yet you see it time and time again. WHY?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon O'Neill » Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:02 pm

Jon Corby wrote:Why do goalkeepers go up for corners, often leaving 1 or 2 defenders back instead? (see Spurs v Arsenal yesterday for an example.) I can understand them going in for it if everybody is, but why on earth should he go forward in place of a defender otherwise? It's a reasonable assumption that the defender will be better equipped to take on any chance which may have fallen to the keeper, and also that the keeper would be better equipped to deal with any counter-attack by being in his own box and being able to handle it, than a defender stood somewhere around the halfway-line (and is that even a concern, surely the keeper going up for the corner says "we don't really care if we concede again, we need to score with this attack"). Yet you see it time and time again. WHY?
You need to keep at least one person outside the box, not to defend but to recycle the ball if it gets cleared.

So you have a choice of that being your keeper or someone else. Usually the keeper will be taller, or at least compensate for not being especially taller by being better at jumping or just being superior at aerial duels as a result of the amount of training they do on them. The players you leave back are likely to be the shortest players... the same ones who mark the posts at the other end I imagine. Usually these will be full-backs or wingers, for whom aerial duels are less important.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon Corby » Mon Oct 03, 2011 3:53 pm

huh, good answer. I probably should've been able to work that one out myself... :? :oops:

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Richard Adams » Mon Oct 03, 2011 4:25 pm

Lesley Hines wrote:
Lesley Hines wrote:
Lesley Hines wrote:What's the scam that I'm missing?
After charming one of the company's Fraud Departments it turns out it's a cashback scam.
The plot thickens. After the arrival of two more (ffs) I rang the respective companies, the first of which said they don't do cashback deals. Back to square one then. On the plus side my house is currently worth £3.05m. Who says there's a recession on? That's the fastest scale of growth I've heard since Man United found the pricing gun in the club shop.
I'm afraid this is no answer to your question, but I wouldn't have thought these policies are valid, Lesley, given that whoever has purchased them has no insurable interest in your house, which I understand is a pre-requisite for a valid contract.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark Deeks » Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:25 pm

How come the plug in the bathroom only has two pins?
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by JimBentley » Mon Oct 03, 2011 5:38 pm

Mark Deeks wrote:How come the plug in the bathroom only has two pins?
It's something to do with electrical safety regulations, normal three point sockets aren't normally allowed in bathrooms without special protection, but two point shaver sockets are allowed. Something like that, anyway. Aha, this is what I was after.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:13 pm

Bath plugs don't need pins.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark Deeks » Mon Oct 03, 2011 6:17 pm

Why's it called lemonade when it doesn't taste of lemons?
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Peter Mabey » Tue Oct 04, 2011 3:04 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote:Bath plugs don't need pins.
I use a safetypin to attach my bath plug to its chain after the link broke ;)

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark James » Fri Oct 07, 2011 10:39 pm

Why does my right earphone keep falling out of my ear when the left one doesn't? Could one ear hole be bigger than the other?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Sat Oct 08, 2011 2:24 pm

Mark James wrote:Why does my right earphone keep falling out of my ear when the left one doesn't? Could one ear hole be bigger than the other?
Before committing to that conclusion, try swapping them round.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon O'Neill » Sat Oct 08, 2011 2:33 pm

Is that a surgical procedure?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Sat Oct 08, 2011 2:36 pm

Jon O'Neill wrote:Is that a surgical procedure?
Well, he could just face the other way.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ryan Taylor » Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:16 am

I posted this to Facebook but I think it is suitable to be in here too:

I just had a bath for the first time in a long while. My face was getting pretty sweaty due to the temperature of the bath and ultimately this just ends up as part of the bath water. My question: Is the rest of body sweating but I just don't know it because it is surrounded by water? And if so, how much sweat throughout maybe a 15 minute bathe is likely to become part of the bath water? Is it a significant amount? Do you need more information such as temperature of bath and volume of water?

It's a serious question. And as an aside? Let's discuss bath time. Who baths like all the time? I find that if ever (rarely) I get a bath I always have a shower beforehand (which defeats the primary reason for getting a bath). Are baths only good for "relaxing" in? I find the heat becomes too unbearable and/or I become bored. What do you do in the bath (serious suggestions)? And how can I enjoy a bath.

Sorry if this has been discussed before.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Matt Morrison » Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:35 am

Interesting question about the sweat. I find that if I have had a bath hot enough for my face to sweat in, then after drying I'd still be getting a bit clammy. I then searched Google, where you'll see the answer is very clear that you definitely do sweat underwater. This page - http://saveyourself.ca/articles/bathing.php - has some really interesting points, basically you're kind of giving yourself an artificial fever if you bath that hot, and you should actually do stuff like keep a cool wet flannel on your head, and remember to drink cold water before, after, and even during a bath. This is a fucking cool page of information actually.

I should bath more, I have medicated coal tar baths for my skin but don't do them as often as I should as Heather doesn't like the strong smell of coal tar. My grandparents used to love it when I lived with them as coal tar used to be a very common ingredient in soaps. So I probably only get round to a bath every month. I never shower before hand, that's pretty odd. But I will often lather myself up with shampoo and shower gel in the bath and then stand up to use the shower to shower it off as the bath runs down the plug before getting out. This is no doubt about washing off the smell of coal tar a little bit as much as ensuring the water I finish using is much cleaner than that which I was sat in for a while.

One thing I almost invariably do in the bath is fall asleep. I just can't help myself, I don't nap that often on sofas or beds during the day but baths just get me, before I know it I'm waking myself up snoring or drowning. I have been known to use my phone in the bath sometimes, but now that I live with Heather there's much less requirement to take sexy naked bath pictures and message them to her, plus you can't use your phone in the bath without getting freaked out and edgy the whole time about the possibility of dropping it, which goes against the relaxing nature of baths. Same with books really, plus it's extra arm work. So I usually just use the bath as relaxation time in the purest way - deep breathing, thinking about stuff, thinking about my limbs and that. I do sometimes have music on in the background, usually by random chance rather than deliberately choosing to do so. And doing stuff like breathing out as much air as you possibly can and feeling your body sink fully to the bottom. And practising holding my breath. (Nowhere near as good as I used to be at that.)

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ryan Taylor » Sun Jan 15, 2012 11:55 am

Good contribution! I feared it would just be laughed off.
Matt Morrison wrote:I find that if I have had a bath hot enough for my face to sweat in, then after drying I'd still be getting a bit clammy.
Yep I was still sweating after like 5 minutes. Had to towel that off which then means that I have sweat on me now even after bathing.
Matt Morrison wrote:This page - http://saveyourself.ca/articles/bathing.php - has some really interesting points
Good page!
Matt Morrison wrote:I never shower before hand, that's pretty odd.
Well, the only times I ever get a bath is when I am feeling sore. I'd just come back from a run this morning and was sweaty so didn't want to get in a bath already sweaty so showered. Similarly after things like football I'd always wash my mucky knees and what not before bathing. Not that odd!
Matt Morrison wrote:One thing I almost invariably do in the bath is fall asleep.
This is one thing I can't do! I just dunno how I could. It's not even that comfortable and the whole sweat thing.
Matt Morrison wrote:some stuff about what to do in a bath
Haha yes I tried the holding my breath thing! And we've had the reading in the bath discussion before. One thing that I used to do when I used to actually bath (when I was a small kid) was me and my brother would play a version of Get Your Own Back. And one of us would sit on the edge of the bath whilst the other sat on the toilet (lid down) and asked questions about kids TV. If you got it wrong the person asking would get to mix some shampoo/shower gel stuff together (always a Batman shaped bubble bath) and then add it to the water (meant to resemble gunge). And after 3 questions you just got dunked (akin GYOB) regardless. Thinking about it now we must have made a LOT of mess of water. It was also quite gay, one of us naked the other fully clothed. Ahh the innocence of youth.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Phil Reynolds » Sun Jan 15, 2012 12:26 pm

Ryan Taylor wrote:What do you do in the bath (serious suggestions)? And how can I enjoy a bath.

Sorry if this has been discussed before.
http://www.c4countdown.co.uk/viewtopic. ... 25#p118425

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Sun Jan 15, 2012 2:33 pm

Ryan Taylor wrote:And how can I enjoy a bath.
Baths and showers are fundamentally unenjoyable experiences. Sorry to disappoint you.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Matt Morrison » Sun Jan 15, 2012 3:19 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote:
Ryan Taylor wrote:And how can I enjoy a bath.
Baths and showers are fundamentally unenjoyable experiences. Sorry to disappoint you.
I can see you saying the same about sex though too Gev. You're all about the function.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ryan Taylor » Sun Jan 15, 2012 5:08 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote:
Ryan Taylor wrote:And how can I enjoy a bath.
Baths and showers are fundamentally unenjoyable experiences. Sorry to disappoint you.
I agree with baths. But how can you say a shower is unenjoyable? It's soooooo freaking nice just stood under a stream of hot water. You never had that feeling where you've been out like a full day or slept somewhere other than your own bed and all you want to do is to get home and just have a nice hot shower? I get that a lot. Showers are awesome things.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Sun Jan 15, 2012 6:06 pm

Ryan Taylor wrote:
Gavin Chipper wrote:
Ryan Taylor wrote:And how can I enjoy a bath.
Baths and showers are fundamentally unenjoyable experiences. Sorry to disappoint you.
I agree with baths. But how can you say a shower is unenjoyable? It's soooooo freaking nice just stood under a stream of hot water. You never had that feeling where you've been out like a full day or slept somewhere other than your own bed and all you want to do is to get home and just have a nice hot shower? I get that a lot. Showers are awesome things.
Well, actually being in the shower (or even in a bath) isn't too bad, but it's completely negated by then having to get out and being cold and having to dry yourself before you can get dressed.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ryan Taylor » Sun Jan 15, 2012 6:32 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote: Well, actually being in the shower (or even in a bath) isn't too bad, but it's completely negated by then having to get out and being cold and having to dry yourself before you can get dressed.
Agreed! 100%. I want one of those drying chambers that just pumps hot air out constantly. Like those things that dry you when you get off like a log flume ride at a theme park.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark James » Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:08 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote:Well, actually being in the shower (or even in a bath) isn't too bad, but it's completely negated by then having to get out and being cold and having to dry yourself before you can get dressed.
I find trying to dry myself after a hot shower is almost impossible. I have to have a cold shower after a hot shower. I quite like cold showers, especially after a sauna. They're great for hangovers too. I don't like baths though. We don't even have a bath in the house any more, we have a walk in shower. My dad has arthritis and can't get in to a bath.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ian Volante » Sun Jan 15, 2012 9:11 pm

We can't fit a bath into our bog, I really miss it. Love showers too, even with the cold get-out. Makes getting dry all the more fun.
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Sun Jan 15, 2012 10:49 pm

Mark James wrote:I have to have a cold shower after a hot shower.
You could lower the temperature during the shower, instead of getting out and getting back in again.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark James » Tue Jan 17, 2012 12:53 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote:
Mark James wrote:I have to have a cold shower after a hot shower.
You could lower the temperature during the shower, instead of getting out and getting back in again.
Eh, that's what I do. I'd still class that as a cold shower after a hot shower.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon O'Neill » Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:01 pm

Mark James wrote:
Gavin Chipper wrote:
Mark James wrote:I have to have a cold shower after a hot shower.
You could lower the temperature during the shower, instead of getting out and getting back in again.
Eh, that's what I do. I'd still class that as a cold shower after a hot shower.
This is going to be the sandwich debate all over again.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ryan Taylor » Tue Jan 17, 2012 1:50 pm

When you wash clothes at a hot temperature it shrinks them. When you wash clothes at a cold temperature, does it make them bigger?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Matt Morrison » Tue Jan 17, 2012 2:34 pm

No.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Tue Jan 17, 2012 10:41 pm

Ryan Taylor wrote:When you wash clothes at a hot temperature it shrinks them. When you wash clothes at a cold temperature, does it make them bigger?
No, but it does work if you dirty them at a hot temperature. If you dirty them at a cold temperature, it's a double negative.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon O'Neill » Wed Jan 25, 2012 1:57 pm

Is there any merit to the three-second rule of dropping food on the floor? i.e. does the "amount of bacteria" on the food increase with time? Linearly?

Is the "amount of bacteria" gained by dropping a crisp on the floor and it rolling about a bit, for example, significant when you consider the amount that probably gets on there from your fingers which have touched dirty stuff like your computer keyboard?

I always just eat stuff that falls on the floor.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Rosemary Roberts » Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:15 pm

Considering how well bacteria can multiply, the "amount" that gets onto dropped food is probably not significant. Though I wouldn't eat food that had lain on the floor for a couple of days.

The only dirt I ever took seriously was dog shit, which can contain the eggs of parasites such as roundworms. So long as you don't let people with shitty shoes walk around your house you should be OK eating off the floor.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ian Volante » Wed Jan 25, 2012 2:52 pm

Yep, carpets impart the least amount of bacteria to dropped food. There was an ignobel prize (I think) for a study on this topic.
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Lesley Hines » Wed Jan 25, 2012 3:47 pm

Jon O'Neill wrote:Is there any merit to the three-second rule of dropping food on the floor? i.e. does the "amount of bacteria" on the food increase with time? Linearly?

Is the "amount of bacteria" gained by dropping a crisp on the floor and it rolling about a bit, for example, significant when you consider the amount that probably gets on there from your fingers which have touched dirty stuff like your computer keyboard?

I always just eat stuff that falls on the floor.
The number of bacteria increase exponentially up to when they run out of resources. The chief one's water, obviously, which is why surfaces aren't properly clean until they're dry. Pathogens aren't just limited to bacteria though, some fungal spores and moulds (e.g. Aspergillus) can be pretty nasty too. Then you've got the infective dose to consider. For really manky stuff like E. coli it's tiny - only a few cells - but other stuff it's in the tens of thousands.

As far as bacterial infection goes, colonies have a 'lag time' usually of about 20 minutes in optimal conditions where they adjust to the new environment before they can start breeding. This is dependent on temperature and resources so unless you've improbably got some extremophile it will be significantly lower in cold dry environments (i.e. your fridge) than in warm moist ones (use your imagination).

The type of food matters too - bacteria can't usually thrive in conditions with a water availability quotient (Aw) lower than 63 (i.e. something's got to be 63% water) so sweets etc. probably have too high a sugar content for bacteria to grow. That's also why sugar's added in preserving. Something like a crisp probably has a fairly low Aw.

Finally you obviously want to remove any visible matter cos you don't know what's in it.

In conclusion: use your judgement.
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark James » Wed Jan 25, 2012 3:53 pm

I accidentally dropped my spaghetti in the bin but I still took it out and ate it. You need to eat a little bit of dirt now and again to boost your immune system.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:00 pm

Mark James wrote:I accidentally dropped my spaghetti in the bin but I still took it out and ate it. You need to eat a little bit of dirt now and again to boost your immune system.
I accidentally dropped my pizza down the toilet. The previous person had just had a shit and hadn't flushed, but I still took it out and ate it. You need to eat a little bit of dirt now and again to boost your immune system.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon Corby » Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:26 pm

Gavin Chipper wrote:
Mark James wrote:I accidentally dropped my spaghetti in the bin but I still took it out and ate it. You need to eat a little bit of dirt now and again to boost your immune system.
I accidentally dropped my pizza down the toilet. The previous person had just had a shit and hadn't flushed, but I still took it out and ate it. You need to eat a little bit of dirt now and again to boost your immune system.
How could you be sure it was a vegetarian turd though?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Mark James » Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:44 pm

That's a bit extreme Gavin. I'm obviously not gonna eat stuff out of the bin if there's shit in it but realistically, what's gonna be in your bin that's so bad? Most of the stuff in the bin is just the containers food comes in in the first place. Also the spaghetti was right on the top, it wasn't like it was mixed in with all the other stuff in there. The Bolognese hadn't been put on it yet either.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Marc Meakin » Wed Jan 25, 2012 4:59 pm

I do hope you didn't lick the bowl afterwards Gevin.
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ian Volante » Wed Jan 25, 2012 5:05 pm

Mark James wrote:That's a bit extreme Gavin. I'm obviously not gonna eat stuff out of the bin if there's shit in it but realistically, what's gonna be in your bin that's so bad? Most of the stuff in the bin is just the containers food comes in in the first place. Also the spaghetti was right on the top, it wasn't like it was mixed in with all the other stuff in there. The Bolognese hadn't been put on it yet either.
I once tipped freshly-cooked spaghetti in the washing-up bowl. Still tasted fine once I'd rinsed it.
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Julie T » Wed Jan 25, 2012 5:34 pm

Lesley Hines wrote:
Jon O'Neill wrote:Is there any merit to the three-second rule of dropping food on the floor? i.e. does the "amount of bacteria" on the food increase with time? Linearly?

Is the "amount of bacteria" gained by dropping a crisp on the floor and it rolling about a bit, for example, significant when you consider the amount that probably gets on there from your fingers which have touched dirty stuff like your computer keyboard?

I always just eat stuff that falls on the floor.
The number of bacteria increase exponentially up to when they run out of resources. The chief one's water, obviously, which is why surfaces aren't properly clean until they're dry.
As far as bacterial infection goes, colonies have a 'lag time' usually of about 20 minutes in optimal conditions where they adjust to the new environment before they can start breeding.

Finally you obviously want to remove any visible matter cos you don't know what's in it.

In conclusion: use your judgement.
Ian Volante wrote:
Mark James wrote:That's a bit extreme Gavin. I'm obviously not gonna eat stuff out of the bin if there's shit in it but realistically, what's gonna be in your bin that's so bad? Most of the stuff in the bin is just the containers food comes in in the first place. Also the spaghetti was right on the top, it wasn't like it was mixed in with all the other stuff in there. The Bolognese hadn't been put on it yet either.
I once tipped freshly-cooked spaghetti in the washing-up bowl. Still tasted fine once I'd rinsed it.
Quite. My rule too, is that if something has been dropped somewhere not too nasty, and if it's picked up within a few minutes, and if it can be rinsed off, then it's fine to eat.
I never knew about the wet surfaces thing, Lesley - I usually leave things to dry off! Although I get fewer stomach upsets these days than when I used to be more thorough with my cleaning when my kids were small.
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Lesley Hines
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Lesley Hines » Wed Jan 25, 2012 6:08 pm

Julie T wrote:I never knew about the wet surfaces thing, Lesley - I usually leave things to dry off!
Leaving to dry (as long as the surface was properly sanitised first) = better than using a cloth, which is likely to reinfect.

Same with crap hand driers - they just create an aerosol effect that throws bacteria-y water from where people haven't washed their hands properly (and most people don't) into the air. Airblades (as previously discussed) vg as they contain what they're removing.

The most important factor in food hygiene is personal! Clean hands lots. If you're getting fewer bugs now it's more likely to be because children are supercarriers, generally having very poor personal hygiene even with the most neurotic parents.
Lowering the averages since 2009

Liam Tiernan
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Liam Tiernan » Wed Jan 25, 2012 7:53 pm

I remember seeing the three-second rule covered on Mythbusters. Result: Busted

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ryan Taylor » Tue Feb 28, 2012 3:03 pm

Who is the dick that designed the first TV remote layout? It is almost impossible to use in the dark which is how I like to watch TV when in bed. See second picture for an example of how a TV remote should be set out so that you can feel your way to the correct buttons.

Image

Image

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Jon Corby
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon Corby » Tue Feb 28, 2012 3:21 pm

Ryan Taylor wrote:Who is the dick that designed the first TV remote layout? It is almost impossible to use in the dark which is how I like to watch TV when in bed. See second picture for an example of how a TV remote should be set out so that you can feel your way to the correct buttons.

Image

Image
I recently(ish, well probably a year ago) moved to Virgin from Sky, and probably my major gripe is with the ridiculous remote control:

Image

As you say, just impossible to use without looking at it. It doesn't even have well defined buttons, they're as smooth as the control casing itself and barely raised. Awful.

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Innis Carson
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Innis Carson » Thu Mar 01, 2012 5:47 pm

Diluting juice, diluted properly, tastes fine. Water on its own tastes fine. So why does overdiluted juice taste so unbearably bad? Not just "not as nice as properly diluted juice", but actually revolting. What is it about this particular intermediate concentration of juice that the body reacts so badly to? Or is it just me that feel this?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Ian Volante » Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:39 pm

No, I agree. Not as bad as drinking milk when you're expecting fruit juice though. Or vice versa.
meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles meles

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Thu Mar 01, 2012 6:49 pm

Innis Carson wrote:Diluting juice, diluted properly, tastes fine. Water on its own tastes fine. So why does overdiluted juice taste so unbearably bad? Not just "not as nice as properly diluted juice", but actually revolting. What is it about this particular intermediate concentration of juice that the body reacts so badly to? Or is it just me that feel this?
On a related note, cunts that put lemon in your water in a restaurant should all be executed.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Matt Morrison » Fri Mar 02, 2012 12:08 am

Gavin Chipper wrote:
Innis Carson wrote:Diluting juice, diluted properly, tastes fine. Water on its own tastes fine. So why does overdiluted juice taste so unbearably bad? Not just "not as nice as properly diluted juice", but actually revolting. What is it about this particular intermediate concentration of juice that the body reacts so badly to? Or is it just me that feel this?
On a related note, cunts that put lemon in your water in a restaurant should all be executed.
When we were at the bingo this week the dude at the bar said "I'm going to put lemon and lime in your drinks [cokes], I hope you're ok with that" - so weirdly phrased, a bit of information rather than a question.
Anyway, I said "only in one" as Heather absolutely hates it.
But even then, mine was mental - it had two fat slices of lime in and one fat slice of lemon. Not joking, together they made about half a fruit, and they kept getting in my way trying to drink.
Seriously thinking of joining the Chipper-Badcock brigade after that.

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Jon Corby
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Jon Corby » Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:54 am

Matt Morrison wrote:
Gavin Chipper wrote:
Innis Carson wrote:Diluting juice, diluted properly, tastes fine. Water on its own tastes fine. So why does overdiluted juice taste so unbearably bad? Not just "not as nice as properly diluted juice", but actually revolting. What is it about this particular intermediate concentration of juice that the body reacts so badly to? Or is it just me that feel this?
On a related note, cunts that put lemon in your water in a restaurant should all be executed.
When we were at the bingo this week the dude at the bar said "I'm going to put lemon and lime in your drinks [cokes], I hope you're ok with that" - so weirdly phrased, a bit of information rather than a question.
Anyway, I said "only in one" as Heather absolutely hates it.
But even then, mine was mental - it had two fat slices of lime in and one fat slice of lemon. Not joking, together they made about half a fruit, and they kept getting in my way trying to drink.
Seriously thinking of joining the Chipper-Badcock brigade after that.
I always keep them in, it's one (or three in this case) of my five-a-day.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by David Williams » Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:26 am

Matt Morrison wrote:When we were at the bingo this week the dude at the bar said "I'm going to put lemon and lime in your drinks [cokes].
And I thought I had a wild social life.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:32 pm

I don't mind the lemon if it's in a non-water drink though.

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Rosemary Roberts
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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Rosemary Roberts » Fri Mar 02, 2012 8:41 pm

In south Germany we were served wheat beer with a slice of lemon. That was not universally well received.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Fri Mar 02, 2012 9:18 pm

Rosemary Roberts wrote:In south Germany we were served wheat beer with a slice of lemon. That was not universally well received.
If I ordered a slice of lemon, I certainly would not be happy for it to be accompanied by wheat beer.

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Gavin Chipper » Sat Oct 19, 2013 2:37 pm

Why are longitude and latitude the wrong way round?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Dave Preece » Mon Nov 04, 2013 12:10 pm

Why do iPhones not come on straight away when you plug a charger into it when it's dead, like most phones do?

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Re: Questions you've always wanted answered

Post by Johnny Canuck » Tue Nov 05, 2013 1:19 am

At exactly what (faster-than-light) speed would you have to travel in order to escape a black hole?
There are three erors in this semtence.

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